Lin Ke
  • About
  • Biography
  • Exhibitions
  • Artworks
    • Performance
    • Photography
    • New Media
    • Video
    • Other
  • Articles
  • Publications
  • Lin Ke
  • Birthdate: 1984
    Birthplace: China | Zhejiang
    Gender: Male
    Lives and Works in: China | Beijing
    About:
    PRIZES AND AWARDS
    Education:
    2008    BFA, New Media Department, China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, China
    Related Documents:
  • Biography
  • SOLO EXHIBITIONS

    2014  L in K, Gallery Yang, Beijing

    2016  LIKE ME ,BANK,Shanghai, China

     

    GROUP EXHIBITIONS

    2017  FRONTIER - RE-ASSESSMENT OF POST-GLOBALISATIONAL POLITICS OCAT Contemporary Art Terminal Shanghai , Shanghai, China

    2017  SIMUL TANEOUS EIDOS - GUANGZHOU LMAGE TRIENNIAL ,Guangdong Museum, Guangzhou, China

    2017  The Esastasy of Time – Reframing the Medium of Knowing, He Xiangning Art Museum, Shen Zhen,China

    2017  Sharing Exhibition Episode 1 - Time Dividuals, Screen Room

    2017  You Really Know Where You Are, For the First Time In History, Intelligentsia Gallery, Beijing, China

    2017  .com/.cn, K11 Art Foundation Pop-up Space, Hong Kong

    2017  AFTER US,chi K11 art museum,Shanghai, China

    2017  Dragon Liver, Phoenix Brain — Eight Emerging Artists, OCAT Shanghai, Shanghai, China

    2016  South Chambers: G&G Lab Exhibition and GROWiTH, Shenzhen New Media Festival, Shenzhen, China

    2016  A Strong Gale in the Dark Forest, The Decameron: BMCA Contemporary Chinese Art Exhibition, Beijing, China

    2016  Dragon, Liver, Phoenix, Brain: Eight Emerging Artists, OCAT Shanghai, Shanghai, China

    2016  Addicted to the Screen: Lin Ke Solo Project, Goethe Institute, Beijing, China

    2016  Jian Ce & Lin Ke: I am not a Robot, Galerie Philine Cremer, Dusseldorf, Germany

    2016  The 11th Shanghai Biennial: Why Not Ask Again, Shanghai, China

    2016  Performing the Shot: Video Works from the Collection of Wang Bin, New Century Art Foundation, Shanghai, China

    2016  Holzwege, ShangART Gallery West Bund, Shanghai, China

    2016  Each to his Own: Li Wendong & Wei Xingye Collection, OCAT Contemporary Art Xi’an, Xi’an, China

    2016  LIFE·FOREST, Wanying Art Museum, Shijiazhuang, China

    2016  The Image Expression In the Art Practice of New Generation, Gallery 4 of Xi’an Museum, Xi’an, China

    2016  Inner Universe, Gallery Yang, Beijing, China

    2016  Turning Point: Contemporary Art in China Since 2000, Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai, China

    2016  Screen Test: Chinese Video Art Since 1980s, CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China

    2016  Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Art of China 2015, Beijing Minsheng Art Museum, Beijing, China

    2016  This Future of Ours, Red Brick Art Museum, Beijing, China

    2016  We: A Community of Chinese Contemporary Artists, Shanghai, China

    2016  GLOBALE: New Sensorium, ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, Germany

    2016  Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Art of China 2015, Beijing Minsheng Art Museum, Beijing, China

    2016  Artificial Fairyland: 2015 Chinese and South Korean Young Art Exhibition, Suzhou Jinji Lake Art Museum, Suzhou, China

    2016  Peepshow, Long March Space, Beijing, China

    2016  The Ballad Of Generation Y, OCAT Contemporary Art Terminal Shanghai, Shanghai, China

    2016  Inventing Ritual, No. 3 building, No. 5808, Shenzhuan Road, Songjiang District, Shanghai, China

    2016  Editing the Spectacle: the Individual and Working Methods Post-Mediatization, Hive Center For Contemporary Art, Beijing, China

    2016  Tokyo Art Meeting VI, TOKYO: Sensing the Cultural Magma of the Metropolis, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
    2015  Drug-Group Exhibition of the Chinese and Foreign Artists, Hunsand Space, Beijing, China

    2015  Jing Shen, Pac Padiglione D'arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy

    2015  28°00′N 120°42′E, How Art Museum, Wenzhou, China 

    2015  Microscope: The Inner Mindscape of 5 Contemporary Chinese Artists, Leo Gallery, Shanghai, China

    2015  Wang Wang Wang, I: project space, Beijing, China

    2015  Works in Progress: Photography from China, Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany

    2015  Absolute Infinite Game, Chengdu A4 Contemporary Arts Center, Chengdu, China

    2015  The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even, Pekin Gallery, Beijing, China

    2015  The Cabinet of Wonder, Beijing, China

    2015  The 2nd “CAFAM Future” Exhibition: Observer-Creator · The Reality Representation of Chinese Young Art, CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China

    2014  OCAT-Pierre Huber Art Prize Shortlist Exhibition: The Truth About Entropy, OCAT Contemporary Art Terminal Shanghai, Shanghai, China

    2014  Teach us to care and not to cart—Teach us to sit still, BANK, Shanghai, China

    2014  A Room Not of One’s Own, Space Station, Beijing, China
    2014  Too Smart to Be Good?: The 7th A+A, PIFO Gallery, Beijing, China

    2013  The Sun, V Arts Centre, Shanghai, China

    2012  I KNOW, Sanshang Art, Hangzhou, China I DON’T KNOW, SanshangArt, Hangzhou, China

    2012  MAKE UP, V Arts Centre, Shanghai, China

    2011  Media Perspective: Chongqing International Artist Workshop, Haus space, Chongqing, China

    2011  Informal novels, Vanguard Gallery, Shanghai, China

    2011  TOP Events: 2nd Session, TOP Contemporary Art Center, Shanghai, China 
    2011  TOP Events, TOP Contemporary Art Center, Shanghai, China

    2011  Yun Lang Project, Aike-DellArco, Shanghai, China Low Fat, HanHouse, Hangzhou, China

    2010  Defocus, Hangzhou Normal University Museum of Modern Art, Hangzhou, China

    2010  Get it Louder, SOHO Sanlitun, Beijing, China

    2010  DEDICATED TO MONEY MAKERS: Li Ming, Lin Ke, Yang Junling, MadeInSpace, Shanghai, China

    2010  Company Project: Incommunicable, Platform China, Beijing, China

    2010  Use the Hand do the Job, Shift Station, Shanghai, China

    2010  Youth in the Combustion, Yi Ge Studios, Hangzhou, China

    2009  Regression, YN Art Gallery, Hangzhou, China

    2009  Vanishing, Ddm Warehouse, Shanghai, China

    2009  Small Production: " sixth" " seventh " "ninth", Hangzhou, China; Shanghai, China

    2008  Small Production: "first" "second" "fourth” "fifth", Hangzhou, China; Shanghai, China

    2008  New Media Art Department Graduate Exhibition, Hangzhou, China

    2008  Check Room: Contemporary Art Exhibition China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, China

    2007  Future is in Future: Group Exhibition of Young Artists, ShangART Gallery, Shanghai, China

    2007  Shanghai E-Arts Festival: Stack, Shanghai, China
    2007  Human spread of "go" interactive installation, loft49, Hangzhou, China

    PRIZES/AWARDS

    2014  OCAT - Pierre Huber Art Prize
    2015  Ninth AAC Art of the Chinese Youth Artist Award

    2017 was nominated for the eleventh AAC art of the Chinese Youth Artist Award for the year

    2017 shortlist nominated for the BMW Art Journey at Art Basel Hong Kong

    Member of Double Fly Art Center

     

  • Exhibitions
    • ART 021
      Nov 9, 2017 - Nov 12, 2017
      Opening: Nov 9, 2017 16:00 Thursday
      Artists: aaajiao , Chen Zhuo, Dong Dawei, Fan Xi, Kong Lingnan, Lin Ke, Lü Song, Yang Song, Zhan Chong
      • Art Fairs
    • Inner Universe
      Aug 21, 2016 - Sep 1, 2016
      Opening: Aug 7, 2016 16:00 Sunday
      Artists: aaajiao , Ding Shiwei, Dong Dawei, Fan Xi, Gao Ruyun, Kong Lingnan, Li Binyuan, Lin Ke, Lu Yang, Sun Yan, UFO+Feng Hao , Wen Ling, Yan Bing, Zeng Hong , Zhan Chong , Zhang Yongji, Zhang Xinjun, Zheng Jiang
      • Group Exhibitions
    • ART021
      Nov 20, 2015 - Nov 22, 2015
      Artists: Chen Zhuo, Kong Lingnan, Li Binyuan, Lin Ke, Yan Bing, Zeng Hong , Zhan Chong , Zhang Yue
      • Art Fairs
    • L in K
      Jul 26, 2014 - Aug 31, 2014
      Opening: Jul 26, 2014 16:00 Saturday
      Artist: Lin Ke
      • Solo Exhibitions
  • Artworks
  • More...
  • Articles
    • Lin Ke | When New Media Becomes Old

       

      LIN KE’S STUDIO is his 2008 MacBook Pro, preloaded with the Mac OS X 10.6.8 operating system and standard software in- cluding the Safari web browser, Preview image viewer, and Quick- Time 7.0 Pro for video, along with the addition of image editing software Photoshop CS4 and Screenium for screencasting. This is his working environment; the internet provides an endless sup- ply of material. The notebook was the first generation “panda” machine produced by Apple, so nicknamed for its metal case with a black frame around the screen and black keys (now the standard design), which replaced the previous all-white “baby white” model. However you look at it, the 2008 version is already getting old, and Lin’s machine has recently begun to develop problems, the unex- pected effects of which have given him new inspiration.

       

      In 2008, Lin Ke had just graduated from the New Media de- partment of the China Academy of Art. Students with good spe- cialist technical skills were recruited into the department’s studio to work on projects for the Shanghai eArts festival and the 2010 World Expo. Though adept with many mainstream software pro- grams, Lin is no geek. In his own work he does not use software as a technical means to achieve particular intended effects, but rather sets each function free from its original purpose in the way that language is liberated from its communicative functions to become poetic. If poetry expresses the joy of language, Lin Ke’s work brings out the pleasure of the graphical user interface. He does not care how the programs work or what they were designed for; he is intent only on making the interface fun and visually compelling.

       

      Lin Ke views virtual spaces with a natural eye, making them appear like a false reality. In The Folder in Dusk (2010) he turns tabs orange and sets as the background an image of a beach scene at evening, making the tabs look like shafts of sunlight. In The Wind of Virtual Memory, he uses the path deform tool in Photoshop to drag a graphic diagram back and forth, creating the effect of a sail billowing in the wind; in Waves the magic wand tool creates a ashing effect at the edge of a selected area, appearing as sunlight re ected on the surface of moving water; Traditional Romance (2012) uses the RGB curve in Photoshop to continually alter the image of a screening room as though the image on the screen itself were constantly shifting. The most typical of this group of works is Star Travel (2013), in which a polygon drawing tool maps a constella- tion onto an image of the night sky; at the moment when the shape is closed it ickers as if a door to space is opening, and then the whole of the selected area slowly moves, beginning a countdown to a great leap through time and space. This series, based on the functions of the Photoshop interface, imbues digital space with a human vitality and intelligence.

       

      The technology in Lin’s work is ordinary—anyone who uses Photoshop will be very familiar with these operations, but they are not likely to have thought to view these graphical effects themselves as artistic language. Perhaps in uenced by the Small Productions collective in Hangzhou, Lin’s technical threshold has always been low. His “Folder” series presents one such example: only basic knowledge of how to use a computer is necessary, just slightly more complex than breathing—and who would make art out of breathing? To a great extent, Lin’s art comes from discover- ing, imagining, and recreating elements of the computer interface that people go without noticing: in his imagination, the pop-up dialogue box warning user of a duplicate file name becomes a greeting: Folders Meet and Say Hello. Works like The Universe Folder and Egg Makes Chicken Makes Egg are laid out using the nesting structure of folders and shortcuts. To turn basic computing opera- tions that come as naturally as eating, ­­­­­sleeping, or breathing into an interesting game requires sensitivity to what they can signify, as well as a need for fun and, most importantly, complete immersion in the digital world.

       

      This is not a discussion of cutting-edge technologies or brain- computer interfaces. The constant development of media to extend human capability has long been a part of our nature. Like the writing brush for the Chinese scholar of old or the harpsichord for Bach, networked computers and screen interfaces are integral to Lin Ke’s generation, bearing not only a consciousness but also a body. Works like Plants Massage the Eyes of the People, pu, and the recently completed Lightning demonstrate that Lin is not an exter- nal controller but rather an internal participant in this world who does not distinguish between outside and inside—the artist be- hind the screen controlling the computer is the same person who appears live on his webcam.

       

      In reality, Lin Ke is not at all interested in the theoretical problems of technical media, because he is not trying to stand outside the medium or view it from a critical perspective. In con- temporary Chinese art, awareness of media criticism was built up by his teachers, like Zhang Peili and Geng Jianyi, but in his ideas about new media Lin goes against the prevailing view by instinc- tively throwing himself into the beautiful new world of media, crit- ical or re ective distance thrown to the wind. As a result, his work marks a signi cant departure from the calm, restrained aesthetic of the previous generation of new media artists, turning from a rigid understanding of technical possibilities to a hedonistic use of soft technology. Lin certainly indulges his rebellious behavior to some degree (he is also a member of Shuangfei Art Center), as if to emphasize his rough, low-tech aesthetic with an alternately light touch and deliberate exaggeration.

       

      The concept of new media art in China dates institutionally to 2001, when the China Academy of Art New Media Center in Hangzhou and the Loft New Media Art Center in Beijing were founded. In 2003, the New Media Center was elevated to the sta- tus of an academic department and started to accept students; Lin Ke was in the second class, which enrolled in 2004. Ten years on, new media is like a piece of worn in clothing—familiar, comfort- able, and relaxing when wearing it. Lin Ke has implicitly followed this trend, but he has also taken his own road. (Translated by Van- essa Nolan) 

    [Featured] Lin Ke | When New Media Becomes Old

    By Bao Dong 2014

     

    LIN KE’S STUDIO is his 2008 MacBook Pro, preloaded with the Mac OS X 10.6.8 operating system and standard software in- cluding the Safari web browser, Preview image viewer, and Quick- Time 7.0 Pro for video, along with the addition of image editing software Photoshop CS4 and Screenium for screencasting. This is his working environment; the internet provides an endless sup- ply of material. The notebook was the first generation “panda” machine produced by Apple, so nicknamed for its metal case with a black frame around the screen and black keys (now the standard design), which replaced the previous all-white “baby white” model. However you look at it, the 2008 version is already getting old, and Lin’s machine has recently begun to develop problems, the unex- pected effects of which have given him new inspiration.

     

    In 2008, Lin Ke had just graduated from the New Media de- partment of the China Academy of Art. Students with good spe- cialist technical skills were recruited into the department’s studio to work on projects for the Shanghai eArts festival and the 2010 World Expo. Though adept with many mainstream software pro- grams, Lin is no geek. In his own work he does not use software as a technical means to achieve particular intended effects, but rather sets each function free from its original purpose in the way that language is liberated from its communicative functions to become poetic. If poetry expresses the joy of language, Lin Ke’s work brings out the pleasure of the graphical user interface. He does not care how the programs work or what they were designed for; he is intent only on making the interface fun and visually compelling.

     

    Lin Ke views virtual spaces with a natural eye, making them appear like a false reality. In The Folder in Dusk (2010) he turns tabs orange and sets as the background an image of a beach scene at evening, making the tabs look like shafts of sunlight. In The Wind of Virtual Memory, he uses the path deform tool in Photoshop to drag a graphic diagram back and forth, creating the effect of a sail billowing in the wind; in Waves the magic wand tool creates a ashing effect at the edge of a selected area, appearing as sunlight re ected on the surface of moving water; Traditional Romance (2012) uses the RGB curve in Photoshop to continually alter the image of a screening room as though the image on the screen itself were constantly shifting. The most typical of this group of works is Star Travel (2013), in which a polygon drawing tool maps a constella- tion onto an image of the night sky; at the moment when the shape is closed it ickers as if a door to space is opening, and then the whole of the selected area slowly moves, beginning a countdown to a great leap through time and space. This series, based on the functions of the Photoshop interface, imbues digital space with a human vitality and intelligence.

     

    The technology in Lin’s work is ordinary—anyone who uses Photoshop will be very familiar with these operations, but they are not likely to have thought to view these graphical effects themselves as artistic language. Perhaps in uenced by the Small Productions collective in Hangzhou, Lin’s technical threshold has always been low. His “Folder” series presents one such example: only basic knowledge of how to use a computer is necessary, just slightly more complex than breathing—and who would make art out of breathing? To a great extent, Lin’s art comes from discover- ing, imagining, and recreating elements of the computer interface that people go without noticing: in his imagination, the pop-up dialogue box warning user of a duplicate file name becomes a greeting: Folders Meet and Say Hello. Works like The Universe Folder and Egg Makes Chicken Makes Egg are laid out using the nesting structure of folders and shortcuts. To turn basic computing opera- tions that come as naturally as eating, ­­­­­sleeping, or breathing into an interesting game requires sensitivity to what they can signify, as well as a need for fun and, most importantly, complete immersion in the digital world.

     

    This is not a discussion of cutting-edge technologies or brain- computer interfaces. The constant development of media to extend human capability has long been a part of our nature. Like the writing brush for the Chinese scholar of old or the harpsichord for Bach, networked computers and screen interfaces are integral to Lin Ke’s generation, bearing not only a consciousness but also a body. Works like Plants Massage the Eyes of the People, pu, and the recently completed Lightning demonstrate that Lin is not an exter- nal controller but rather an internal participant in this world who does not distinguish between outside and inside—the artist be- hind the screen controlling the computer is the same person who appears live on his webcam.

     

    In reality, Lin Ke is not at all interested in the theoretical problems of technical media, because he is not trying to stand outside the medium or view it from a critical perspective. In con- temporary Chinese art, awareness of media criticism was built up by his teachers, like Zhang Peili and Geng Jianyi, but in his ideas about new media Lin goes against the prevailing view by instinc- tively throwing himself into the beautiful new world of media, crit- ical or re ective distance thrown to the wind. As a result, his work marks a signi cant departure from the calm, restrained aesthetic of the previous generation of new media artists, turning from a rigid understanding of technical possibilities to a hedonistic use of soft technology. Lin certainly indulges his rebellious behavior to some degree (he is also a member of Shuangfei Art Center), as if to emphasize his rough, low-tech aesthetic with an alternately light touch and deliberate exaggeration.

     

    The concept of new media art in China dates institutionally to 2001, when the China Academy of Art New Media Center in Hangzhou and the Loft New Media Art Center in Beijing were founded. In 2003, the New Media Center was elevated to the sta- tus of an academic department and started to accept students; Lin Ke was in the second class, which enrolled in 2004. Ten years on, new media is like a piece of worn in clothing—familiar, comfort- able, and relaxing when wearing it. Lin Ke has implicitly followed this trend, but he has also taken his own road. (Translated by Van- essa Nolan) 

  • Publications
    • lin_ke

      By tria

      Catalogues